Compendium.

./welcome.sh
This is the Compendium. We do hope that you won’t run into any problems with Nitrux,
however, no system is perfect!. If you need help with Nitrux check out the information here.
cat /etc/issue
Nitrux 1.1.x

This is the documentation that you're looking for.

Welcome to the Nitrux documentation pages.

Nitrux does things differently than other Linux distributions. Use the concepts section to learn in detail about the features that make Nitrux different. Our documentation is divided into the following sections:

Get Started

If you are new to Nitrux, get started fast with tutorials for installing Nitrux on bare metal or in a virtual environment.

Get Started

FAQ

Find the detailed information you need to enable your configuration or task in our Nitrux reference section.

Read FAQ

Concepts

Wondering what makes Nitrux different? Learn about Nitrux and what differentiates Nitrux from other Linux distributions.

Concepts

Report a Bug

This repository on GitHub allows the filing of general bugs/issues/etc. Against the Linux distribution.

Report an Issue

Help and Support

Get in touch with us if you need an extra helping hand with your experience in Nitrux. You can find support from a variety of sources. Take a look – you’re likely to find an answer to every question. If you can’t find a solution, ask the people in our active forums.

Gitter

Gitter is an open source messaging system for users of GitHub and Gitlab.

Gitter

MeWe Group

Join our new community over at MeWe, and get the support you need.

MeWe

FB Community

Join our new community over at Facebook, get the support you need.

Facebook

Email

If you have questions about the use of Nitrux please send us an email.

Email

Getting started is easy.

How can I take this excellent Linux distribution for a spin?.

The Get Started section will get you up and running fast with Nitrux. Use these step-by-step instructions to guide you through the deployment of Nitrux.

Hardware requirements

Nitrux does not support the following processor configurations: x86 (32-bit), PowerPC, IA-32, IA-64, RISC, ARM. Nitrux also does not support Motherboards that use CSM or Legacy BIOS to boot operating systems. Deploying Nitrux will convert the target storage device from Master Boot Record or MBR to GUID Partition Table or GPT.

Systems used as a reference for Hardware Requirements: Intel Core2Duo E6400 and Intel Core2Quad Q6600. AMD Phenom II X4 905e, AMD Phenom II X6 1055T, AMD Fusion A4-3420, and DDR3 PC-10600 RAM. AMD Radeon HD 6250, AMD Radeon HD 4770, AMD Radeon HD 7700 and AMD Radeon HD 6410. Nvidia GeForce GT 1030 and  Nvidia GeForce GTX 960 4GB. Intel HD Graphics 620 and Intel GMA X4500. ASUS MA599X EVO R1.0 and ASUS EEE PC 1015BX.

Minimum

CPU2.13 GHz Dual-Core 64-bit
RAM2GB
Storage1.55GB
Display32MB VRAM OpenGL 2.1 Support
NetworkEthernet RJ45 Port
OtherMotherboard with support for USB boot, EFI or UEFI

Recommended

CPU2.4 GHz Quad-Core 64-bit
RAM4GB
Storage1.55GB
Display256MB VRAM OpenGL 3.0 Support
NetworkEthernet RJ45 Port; Wireless card, Bluetooth
OtherMotherboard with support for USB boot, EFI or UEFI

Minimum for VMetal

CPU3.0 GHz Quad-Core 64-bit
RAM8GB
Storage52GB
Display2x UEFI-compatible Graphics Processing Units (2x Discrete; 1 Discrete/1 Integrated; 1 Integrated/1 External)
NetworkEthernet RJ45 Port; Wireless card, Bluetooth
OtherMotherboard with support for USB boot, EFI or UEFI, and IOMMU; CPU support for Intel VT-d and VT-x or AMD-Vi and AMD-V

Recommended for VMetal

CPU3.0 GHz Hexa-Core 64-bit
RAM16GB
Storage52GB
Display2x UEFI-compatible Graphics Processing Units (2x Discrete; 1 Discrete/1 Integrated; 1 Integrated/1 External)
NetworkEthernet RJ45 Port; Wireless card, Bluetooth
OtherMotherboard with support for USB boot, EFI or UEFI, and IOMMU; CPU support for Intel VT-d and VT-x or AMD-Vi and AMD-V; external Audio adapter

Release notes

We are pleased to announce the launch of Nitrux 1.1.7. This new version brings together the latest software updates, bug fixes, performance improvements, and ready-to-use hardware support. Nitrux 1.1.7 is available for immediate download. To update, please check the instructions.

What’s New

The seventh release of Nitrux 1.1.x series.
Updated Linux kernel to LTS version 4.19.47.
Updated Waterfox to version 56.2.10.
Updated LibreOffice to version 6.2.4.
Updated KDE Plasma to version 5.15.5, KDE Frameworks to version 5.58.0, and KDE Applications to version 19.04.1.
znx will now deploy systems in a different order, and each system will have its data directory within its own structure.

Known Issues

Notes

Our ISO is a standard ISO-9660 bootable image. However, our ISO dramatically differs from other conventional Linux ISO files in that ours is not a hybrid-ISO image and this means that the ONLY way to use Nitrux is deploying the ISO image using znx. We DO NOT recommend that you flash the ISO raw to a storage device AT ALL, please use znx.
We only support booting from EFI and UEFI motherboards and not from the CSM or Compatibility Support Module or Legacy BIOS motherboards because of this, meaning that if you have enabled CSM in your UEFI to boot other systems, it must be disabled to boot Nitrux. Most Linux distributions already support UEFI boot.
Nitrux, by default, uses OpenGL (3.1) acceleration as the rendering backend, this is to provide users of a great experience when they are running the distribution on their computers. We do recommend that in this case, testers use XRender instead. We also suggest that users don’t attempt to install the guest additions from the VirtualBox Guest ISO or install the package using APT and this is because the Linux kernel since version 4.16 does already include the video driver and related modules.
A future update will restore the Maui apps (Index, Buho, Pix, VVave, Nota, and Station).

Deploying Nitrux.

How to deploy Nitrux to your storage device.

Deploy using the GUI

How to deploy Nitrux using the GUI. Only follow these steps If you are running Nitrux, otherwise, skip this and use znx from the terminal.

Deploy using the Terminal

How to deploy Nitrux using the Terminal. Follow these steps If you are NOT running Nitrux, otherwise skip this and use znx GUI.

Our ISO is a standard ISO-9660 bootable image. However, our ISO dramatically differs from other conventional Linux ISO files in that ours is not a hybrid-ISO image and this means that the ONLY way to use Nitrux is deploying the ISO image using znx.

You can deploy the ISO by downloading the znx AppImage from an existing Linux environment like a Live USB of a minimal Linux.

We DO NOT recommend using Rufus, LiLi, YUMI neither we recommend Unetbootin nor Multiboot or any tool to write the ISO image raw to the device such as dd, Universal USB Installer, or Etcher. We DO NOT recommend that you flash the ISO raw to a storage device AT ALL, please use znx.

If you are using Windows please our FAQ for more information.

Download znx

To deploy Nitrux you need to download the AppImage of znx. After downloading the file make it executable and run it from the Terminal. znx is a command line utility; all the steps below will be done on a Terminal window unless specified otherwise.

Subsequent deployments of Nitrux can be done using znx GUI from the Nitrux deployment. You can skip downloading the ISO altogether since the ISO would be already available from the device that Nitrux has booted from.

Download 64-Bit AppImage

Deploying Nitrux using znx GUI.

Deploying Nitrux is pretty straightforward. Click the application menu, and open znx this will open znx GUI which is a simple graphical interface for znx.

Be warned that initializing the storage device will wipe the device clean.

Click init to initialize the target device.

Select the target device to initialize. The drive that is selected will be wiped clean.

Select deploy to start the deployment process of Nitrux.

Enter a name for the deployed system. For example, vendor/release.

Enter the full path to the ISO file or enter an HTTP URL to the ISO file.

znx GUI will let you know when it has completed the process.

Good!, Nitrux has been deployed.

You can restart your computer to boot into Nitrux.

Next — Using Nitrux

Deploying Nitrux using the Terminal.

Steps to deploy Nitrux on your storage device with the Terminal.

First identify the device where you will deploy Nitrux, then initialize it. Be warned that initializing the storage device will wipe the device clean.

Then, proceed to deploy Nitrux to the device. Please note that the initialization and the deployment are done to the storage device, e.g., /dev/sda and not a partition, e.g., /dev/sda1, znx will automatically handle partitioning.

Finally, make sure that the ISO has been deployed to the device by emptying the write cache buffers.

sudo ./znx init /dev/sdX
sudo ./znx deploy /dev/sdX nitrux/$version nitrux.iso
sync
exit

Good!, Nitrux has been deployed.

You can restart your computer to boot into Nitrux.

Next — Booting Nitrux

Booting Nitrux.

When booting up Nitrux, you will be greeted by two screens. The first one will be the znx boot menu where you will be able to select the deployed operating system.

The second screen will be this one; this is the Nitrux boot menu. The two entries refer to the CPU technologies that Nitrux makes use of to make VMetal work.

Next — NX Desktop

Login to NX Desktop.

NX Desktop is the flagship desktop of Nitrux. It focuses on simplicity and elegance. Written from scratch with integration in mind, the NX Desktop tightly integrates with the KF5 stack, employing underlying technologies to offer an alternative desktop experience. Video by — Riba Linux

Next — Updating Nitrux

Updating Nitrux.

Nitrux provides updates to the operating system every month. These include security updates, bug fixes or newer versions of the software. All deployed systems should be updated regularly to ensure the system operates most efficiently and securely possible.

Update using the GUI

How to update Nitrux using the GUI. Only follow these steps If you are running Nitrux, otherwise, skip this and use znx from the terminal.

Update using the Terminal

How to update Nitrux using the Terminal. Follow these steps If you are NOT running Nitrux, otherwise skip this and use znx GUI.

Update using znx GUI.

Updating Nitrux is pretty straightforward. Click the application menu, and open znx this will open znx GUI which is a simple graphical interface for znx. Clicking update will upgrade Nitrux.

Click update to start the update process.

Select the target device where the ISO image was deployed.

Enter the name that you gave to the deployed system.

znx will apply the delta update to the ISO image. znx GUI will let you know when it has completed the process.

Good!, Nitrux has been updated.

You don’t need to restart your PC for updates to take effect. However, there are things like kernel updates that do require you to reboot.

Next — Adding New Software

Update using the Terminal.

To get verbose messages during system updates use Konsole, the KDE Terminal emulator. Updating is easy, enter the commands to download and install the available updates for Nitrux. You can also update Nitrux from a different Linux system if you have the AppImage of znx in your path.

sudo ./znx update /dev/sdX nitrux/$version
exit

Good!, Nitrux has been updated.

You don’t need to restart your PC for updates to take effect. However, there are things like kernel updates that do require you to reboot.

Next — Adding New Software

Adding New Software.

You can add new applications by downloading AppImage files.

AppImages come with all dependencies that cannot be assumed to be part of each target system in a recent enough version and will run on most Linux distributions without further modifications.

You can download new AppImages from the web from sites like https://appimage.github.io or https://www.appimagehub.com/.

Moving AppImage files to ~/Applications will add a launcher to the application menu, and it has the additional advantage of using firejail, which will serve as a sandbox for AppImage files.

AppImage.github.io — AppImage Developers

Crowd-sourced AppImage directory. Download an application, and run!. Can also run in a sandbox like firejail.

Go

Appimagehub.com — openDesktop.org

Started in 2001, openDesktop.org is one of the largest communities where developers and artists share applications, themes and other content.

Go

Tip: In the off chance that the application that you’re looking for is not in available from these sources a quick search on your preferred web engine will yield results. If you are still unable to find an AppImage please contact the developer of the software and ask for an AppImage file or support those who create AppImages in their spare time.

Next — Adding New Users

Adding New Users.

The creation of new user accounts is no longer part of the “installation” process (since there’s no installer). New users can be added from System Settings using the User Manager module.

To add a new user to the system click the button “New User” and enter the required information in the fields to the right and click Apply.

Understanding our concepts.

Wondering what makes Nitrux different?.

Learn about Nitrux features and what differentiates Nitrux from other Linux distributions.

System

Nitrux is an operating system based on Linux. Nitrux can be deployed without any need for a traditional installation. The operating system as a whole resides in a single file and directory on the partition /data/ of your device, making it easier to organize with your other data.

Hardware Drivers

Most hardware drivers are included out-of-the-box. You don’t have to hunt down manufacturer-provided drivers for every bit of hardware on your Linux system and install them. Your Linux system should automatically detect your device and use the appropriate hardware drivers.

System Tools

znx is an operating system software manager and update program that operates at a file-level to enable verifiable integrity and update efficiency.

CommandDescription
initInitialize the storage device.
restore_espRestore the ESP (EFI System Partition) of the given device.
deployDeploy an image on a storage device. Do not use whitespaces in filenames.
updateUpdate the specified image.
revertRevert to the previous version of the image.
cleanRemove the backup that is created during an update.
resetDelete all user data of the specified image.
removeRemove the specified image.
statsShow statistics about the provided image.
listList the deployed images.

System Management

Nitrux promotes regular and automated updating of software to ensure integration of new enhancements and security fixes. Because znx operates at the individual file-level instead of a package-level, Nitrux updates are small and fast. On many Linux distributions, upgrades to a particular software package require the whole software package to be downloaded and replaced –even for one line of code. In Nitrux, updates are generated using the zsync tool. Zsync calculates the difference between two Nitrux versions and makes available binary deltas, which contain only the changed portion of files. This binary delta technology means znx on Nitrux systems needs to download and apply a small fraction of a package to receive an update.

znx operates against a published manifest of files for a particular Nitrux version that contains the unique hash of each file; this is the basis of the znx update subcommand, which allows a Nitrux system to check for and remediate any discrepancies to system files. As necessary, znx revert provides a useful way for software developers to return to a known filesystem state.

Software

Nitrux approaches software management differently than many other Linux-based operating systems. Instead of deploying granular software packages, Nitrux uses the concept of AppImages. Each AppImage encapsulates a particular use-case, which is enabled by composing all the required upstream open-source projects and packages into one logical unit.

This AppImage-based approach offers some unique advantages:

  • AppImages include all associated runtime dependencies.
  • Software package dependencies are solved, and file-level conflicts do not occur on the target system after an update.
  • All combinations of AppImage versions can co-exist on a Nitrux.

Software Management

Linux-based operating systems contain the code of several hundred, if not thousands, of open source projects. To make this manageable, distributions use a concept called “packages” to configure and compile the source code of these projects into binaries.

Many distributions then split the content of these compiled packages into so-called sub-packages, which are the granularity at which these distributions deploy their software. With those kinds of distributions, system administrators can then install and update sub-packages individually or as a set, using tools such as “yum” and “apt-get.”

Nitrux takes a slightly different approach. While we also use the concept of packages to manage to compile source code into binaries, we do not use the package concept to deploy software. Instead, we make use of AppImages. Each AppImage contains as many or as few open source projects needed to provide a functional program.

Data Persistence

With znx, there are only two partitions on a storage device, the ESP and the Data partition. The Data partition is where znx saves the ISO files; it too will contain the data for every folder that utilizes the OverlayFS. The Data partition occupies the rest of the available space in the storage device.

OverlayFS provides a great way to merge directories or filesystems such that one of the filesystems (called the “lower” one) never gets written to, but all changes are made to the “upper” one. Brought into the Linux kernel mainline with version 3.18, OverlayFS allows you to overlay the contents (both files and directories) of one directory onto another.

We store data directly on the device, without intermediate files.

Roadmap.

This is a snapshot of what we are planning to do at a given point in time — but like everything else in life, even the best-laid plans are subject to change.

Nitrux 1.0 — June 2017

First public release of Nitrux OS. Based on Ubuntu Zesty.

Nitrux 1.0.x — 2017, 2018

The current set of releases of Nitrux OS. Initially based on Ubuntu Zesty then based on Ubuntu Bionic and currently Ubuntu Cosmic.

Nitrux 1.1 — 2018

First Major Revision of Nitrux OS. Built on Ubuntu Bionic, using znx, and MauiKit.

Nitrux 2.0 — 2019

Second Major Release of Nitrux OS. VMetal, Custom FHS, MauiKit DE.

© 2017-2019 Some Rights Reserved. Made with  by Nitrux Latinoamericana S.C.
Any trademarks or logos used on this site are the property of their respective owners.
Check our Privacy Policy for more information about your data.